Post Traumatic Stress Disorder/ Traumatic Brain Injury Ministry

Our Post Traumatic Stress Disorder/Traumatic Brain Injury Ministry is now up and running.  We have been privileged to have two volunteers to take the certification course, which is now on going on  Wed evenings before prayer meeting.


We hope that we can minister to the people here in Nebraska/Wyoming area, that need the support we can offer them.
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Hello

Hello,
        I would like to take this time to introduce my newest blog.   It has been a privilege for us that God would allow us to become Pastor and Pastor’s wife.   In this blog I would like to give and gain encouragement, to glean and discuss ideas for ministries.  Please be patient as I set this blog up and feel free to give ideas and recommendations to a new Pastor’s wife!


Please feel free to click on the link below “Henry Bible Church” and see what our church is all about!
       

Self Worth

“Let your beauty be found in “the hidden person of the heart, with the incorruptible beauty of a gentle and quiet spirit, which is very precious in the sight of God.” 1 Peter 3:4
Christian ladies, you are not defined by your outward appearance. Your worth and value aren’t measured by what you look like. Your value comes from the fact that you are made in the image of God. Your beauty comes from the fact that the Creator of the Universe knit you together in your mother’s womb and made you just the way He wanted you (Psalm 139:13-16).
You are clean not because of anything you did or could do, but because Jesus Christ, in the midst of your sin, loved you so much that He shed His blood on your behalf…so that you could live and not die.
“Charm is deceitful and beauty is passing, but a woman who fears the Lord, she shall be praised.”
Paul tells us in 1 Corinthians (1 Corinthians 6:20; 7:23) not to become slaves of men because we are bought with a price—because of that we’re told to glorify God in our bodies and in our spirits because both belong to God. Not only are you not your own, but you are not someone else’s property either. If you are a Christian, you belong to God. And, if you belong to God, you are to glorify Him both in body and spirit.  

We are not to become slaves of this world, of the fashion magazines and what society dictates.  We need to remember that our beauty is an inner beauty that defines who we are.  Our outer beauty will soon fade away, leaving us with a few grey hairs, and lines in our faces.  What matters the most is the person inside of us all, and that should be one that reflects the love of God.

What is Good Friday?

Good Friday is the Friday immediately preceding Easter Sunday. It is celebrated traditionally as the day on which Jesus was crucified. 

The Bible does not instruct Christians to remember Christ’s death by honoring a certain day. The Bible does give us freedom in these matters, however. Romans 14:5 tells us, “One man considers one day more sacred than another; another man considers every day alike. Each one should be fully convinced in his own mind.” Rather than remembering Christ’s death on a certain day, once a year, the Bible instructs us to remember Christ’s death by observing the Lord’s SupperFirst Corinthians 11:24-26 declares, “…do this in remembrance of me…for whenever you eat this bread and drink this cup, you proclaim the Lord’s death until he comes.”

Why is Good Friday referred to as “good”? What the Jewish authorities and Romans did to Jesus was definitely not good (see Matthew chapters 26-27). However, the results of Christ’s death are very good! Romans 5:8“But God demonstrates his own love for us in this: While we were still sinners, Christ died for us.” First Peter 3:18 tells us, “For Christ died for sins once for all, the righteous for the unrighteous, to bring you to God. He was put to death in the body but made alive by the Spirit.”

Many Christian churches celebrate Good Friday with a subdued service, usually in the evening, in which Christ’s death is remembered with solemn hymns, prayers of thanksgiving, a message centered on Christ suffering for our sakes, and observance of the Lord’s Supper. Whether or not Christians choose to “celebrate” Good Friday, the events of that day should be ever on our minds because the death of Christ on the cross is the paramount event of the Christian faith.


Good Friday Calendar:
2012 = April 6
2013 = March 29
2014 = April 18
2015 = April 3

What is Maundy Thursday?



Maundy Thursday, also known as “Holy Thursday” is the Thursday of Passion Week, one day before Good Friday (the Thursday before Easter). Maundy Thursday is the name given to the day on which Jesus celebrated the Passover with His disciples, known as the Last Supper. Two important events are the focus of Maundy Thursday.

First, Jesus celebrated the Last Supper with His disciples and thereby instituted the Lord’s Supper, also called Communion (Luke 22:19-20). Some Christian churches observe a special Communion service on Maundy Thursday in memory of Jesus’ Last Supper with His disciples. Second, Jesus washed the disciples’ feet as an act of humility and service, thereby setting an example that we should love and serve one another in humility (John 13:3-17). Some Christian churches observe a foot-washing ceremony on Maundy Thursday to commemorate Jesus’ washing the feet of the disciples.

The word “Maundy” is derived from the Latin word for “command.” The “Maundy” in Maundy Thursday refers to the command Jesus gave to the disciples at the Last Supper, that they should love and serve one another. Should we observe Maundy Thursday? The Bible neither commands nor forbids it. It is a good thing to remember the Last Supper and Jesus’ sacrifice on our behalf. It is a good thing to remember the Lord’s example of humility. However, at the same time, we should avoid ritualistic observances of holidays unless they are truly focused on God and our relationship with Him.

What is Palm Sunday?

What is Palm Sunday

When Is Palm Sunday | What does Palm Sunday Mean?

Palm Sunday is one of the most important days in the Christian calendar afterChristmas and Easter. Palm Sunday is the Sunday before Easter, and marks the beginning of Holy Week, the week of events leading up to Jesus’ death.

The History of Palm Sunday
The celebration of Palm Sunday originated in the Jerusalem Church, around the late fourth century. The early Palm Sunday ceremony consisted of prayers, hymns, and sermons recited by the clergy while the people walked to various holy sites throughout the city. At the final site, the place where Christ ascended into heaven, the clergy would read from the gospels concerning the entry of Jesus into Jerusalem. In the early evening they would return to the city reciting: “Blessed is He that comes in the name of the Lord.” The children would carry palm and olive branches as the people returned through the city back to the church, where they would hold evening services.

By the fifth century, the Palm Sunday celebration had spread as far as Constantinople. Changes made in the sixth and seventh centuries resulted in two new Palm Sunday traditions – the ritual blessing of the palms, and a morning procession instead of an evening one. Adopted by the Western Church in the eighth century, the celebration received the name “Dominica in Palmis,” or “Palm Sunday”.

The Meaning of Palm Sunday
Palm Sunday commemorates the triumphal entry of Jesus into Jerusalem to celebrate the Passover. The gospels record the arrival of Jesus riding into the city on a donkey, while the crowds spread their cloaks and palm branches on the street and shouted “Hosanna to the Son of David” and “Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord” to honor him as their long-awaited Messiah and King.

The significance of Jesus riding a donkey and having his way paved with palm branches is a fulfillment of a prophecy spoken by the prophet Zechariah (Zechariah 9:9). In biblical times, the regional custom called for kings and nobles arriving in procession to ride on the back of a donkey. The donkey was a symbol of peace; those who rode upon them proclaimed peaceful intentions. The laying of palm branches indicated that the king or dignitary was arriving in victory or triumph.

Palm Sunday in Modern Times
Today, Palm Sunday traditions are much the same as they have been since the tenth century. The ceremony begins with the blessing of the palms. The procession follows, then Mass is celebrated, wherein the Passion and the Benediction are sung. Afterwards, many people take the palms home and place them in houses, barns, and fields.

In some countries, palms are placed on the graves of the departed. In colder northern climates, where palm trees are not found, branches of yew, willow, and sallow trees are used. The palms blessed in the ceremony are burned at the end of the day. The ashes are then preserved for next year’s Ash Wednesday celebration.